ArkIVBlack


Anvil Class Carrier- LL 509 “Ark IV” Length: 180 meters Armament: Heavy laser turrets (2) Medium laser turrets (2) Centurion LOS medium anti-cruiser Magnetic Acceleration Rail Cannon, 1-“barrell” (2) Quad link anti-fighter laser turrets (12) Complement: Up to 24 Warden Class Interceptors Crew: 160 With the limited fighter capacity of the Forge Battle Cruiser, the Coalition commissioned a complimentary second ship, the Anvil Class Fighter Carrier. The Fighter Carrier had a much lower combat rating than the Forge Battle Cruiser receiving only a class 6 battle-rating (excluding the weapons capabilities of the fighters) due to the weapons configuration which consisted of 2 heavy laser batteries, 2 medium laser batteries, and 2 medium duty anti-cruiser single barrel MARCs (but no missile pods or peace keeper orbital weaponry) with the additional weapons mounts all dedicated to anti-fighter turrets. Despite the lower combat rating, the Anvil Fighter Carrier, is outfitted with an armor and design configuration which made the ship more durable than most other ships with carrier or support roles. Additionally, the hanger bay entry points in the middle of the ship allowed for better protection of the bays than traditional carrier designs with the hanger bay entrances located on the outer hull of the ship. The durability combined with the firepower of the Warden Class interceptors meant the combined battle-rating of the Anvil Fighter Carrier and a full complement of fighters was much closer to a class 8. This meant the carrier could be used on solo missions when battleships or long-range missile frigates were not anticipated to be in heavy use. The main drawback of the Anvil Class Fighter Carrier was its size. The carrier was nearly double the width of primary attack craft like the Forge Class Battle Cruiser of the Hammer Class Missile Corvette. This issue was often overcome by keeping the carrier in a support position behind heavy assault ships, or if the carrier was in closer proximity to the battle, using a unique design feature to separate the carrier in two. Separating the carrier in two provides for more flexibility in use and much smaller targeting areas, though it does lose some of its more appealing features such as the center mounted hanger bays and the ability to operate with two distinct shield generators for additional toughness. The separation feature also meant each half was required to contain a full range of critical ship’s systems. While this made the carriers more expensive to manufacture and crew, it also made them more reliable and durable.

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